Skip to main content

DeBug System

Lakota Elementary's DeBug System

Lakota Elementary is initiating a program called the "DeBug System" which is designed to help children learn to solve problems created when others are bothering them.

The purpose of the "DeBug System" is to equip children with a series of steps they can use to solve problems when others are "bugging" them.  It helps children learn to be assertive and encourages self-management.  It also helps define the adult's role as one of assisting children after they have attempted to resolve the difficulty themselves.

The 5 steps of the DeBug System are simple.  The steps are listed.  You may want to post them on your refrigerator or bulletin board and implement them at home as well.

The adult response, when a child complains about a conflict with another student, is to ask the following:

1.  Have you tried the DeBug System?

2.  What step are you on?

3.  Come back if you get to step 5.

If you would like more information about the DeBug System please contact me.

Faye Brosy Nelson - Lakota School Counselor

Another problem solving method. (WDEP)

W - what do you want?

D - what are you doing to get what you want?

E - evaluation, how's that working for you?

P - plan, what steps can you take to get what you want.  If this isn't working, make a new plan.

Teacher/Adult Response using the DeBug System

The five steps of the DeBug system are simple.

The children are taught that if someone is bugging them, they should try the following:

1.  Ignore.  If that doesn't work.....

2.  Move away.  If that doesn't work.......

3.  Talk friendly.  If that doesn't work......

4.  Talk firmly.  If that doesn't work.......

5.  Get adult help.

The adult response when a child complains about a conflict with another student, is to ask the following?

1.  Have you tried the DeBug System?

2.  What step are you on?

3.  Come back if you get to step five.

When a child has reached step five and needs adult help, the adult follows these steps:

1.  Send for the other child involved.

2.  Provide a place they can talk.

Have them discuss:

- What do you want to happen?

-What are you doing to make that happen?

-How's that working for you?

-How can you make that happen?

-Express confidence that they can work it out.

-Have the children share their agreement with the adult.

-If absolutely necessary, help the children talk it through.